Search results in category Alzheimer’s

When you receive a diagnosis of Alzheimer’s disease for yourself or a loved one your first best step will be to learn all that you can about the disease. At the Senior Care Society we understand that this is very unsettling news to receive, hence we have provided a series of articles here to help you get a better understanding of Alzheimer’s and how you can be as prepared as possible for managing it.

Senior Care Society is proud to have joined with the Alzheimer's Association as a member of the Alzheimer's Early Detection Alliance.  As a member we are committed to educating everyone about the warning signs of Alzheimer's and the importance of early detection.

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Alzheimer’s Care Options: Be Proactive, Plan Ahead

Published: 04/10/2012 by Michelle Seitzer in Alzheimer’s

Getting an Alzheimer’s or dementia diagnosis is nothing short of devastating. Harder still is when a decision must be made about care, either because the caregiver can no longer manage things on his/her own, or because the physical ramifications of the disease necessitate hospitalization or specialized care.

What is Alzheimer’s Disease?

Published: 02/07/2012 by Michelle Seitzer in Alzheimer’s

When you receive a diagnosis of Alzheimer’s disease for yourself or a loved one your first best step will be to learn all that you can about the disease. At the Senior Care Society we understand that this is very unsettling news to receive, hence we have provided a series of articles here to help you get a better understanding of Alzheimer’s and how you can be as prepared as possible for managing it.

The Senior Care Society has provided a series of articles on how to prepare for a diagnosis of Alzheimer’s and the coping skills to manage stress when you are a caregiver for a loved one struggling with Alzheimer’s disease. This article was written to assist you further with your coping skills in a way you may not have thought of, using your imagination.

Preparing & Safeguarding Your Home for Alzheimer’s Disease

Published: 02/09/2012 by Michelle Seitzer in Caregiving

A diagnosis of Alzheimer’s disease although very serious does not necessarily mean you will no longer be able to care for your loved one at home. But, it does mean that you will have to prepare yourself in numerous ways, the Senior Care Society is here to help you with those preparations; physically, medically, and emotionally

Alzheimer’s Disease and Bathing: Tips for Success

Published: 10/22/2012 by Carrie Steckl, Ph.D in Alzheimer’s

If you are caring for someone with Alzheimer’s, you may already know that bathing can become a challenge as the disease progresses. In the early stages, your loved one may be able to bathe or shower on his or her own with little assistance other than gentle reminders that it’s time to do so.

Overnight Dementia Camp Shows Ingenuity and Acceptance

Published: 10/22/2012 by Carrie Steckl, Ph.D. in Alzheimer’s

Banging pots. Loud singing. And the fear that your loved one might try to walk out the door at 3 AM.

Do these things sound familiar? If so, you are probably caring for someone with dementia who suffers from sundowner’s syndrome, or the tendency to become more agitated and alert in the evening and nighttime hours. Some individuals with dementia do not sleep at night at all, despite the best efforts of caregivers and professionals to create an environment conducive to sleep.

How Alzheimer’s Disease is Diagnosed

Published: 02/13/2012 by Carrie Steckl, Ph.D. in Alzheimer’s

If you or a loved one are displaying signs of more than just typical forgetfulness and you have concerns that it may be Alzheimer’s disease, we at the Senior Care Society strongly suggest that you confide in a trusted loved one your concerns. Together with your confidant you should seek an evaluation by your physician.

The stresses of a caregiver’s daily life can become overwhelming and lead to caregiving crisis without proper planning, resources, networking and utilizing stress management tools available here at the Senior Care Society. One of the key elements in functioning as a loving caregiver is to be able to handle the inevitable stress that accompanies your job as a caregiver, particularly of caregivers to those suffering from the effects of Alzheimer’s disease.

Caregiving involves many challenges and changes, but the most difficult may be when a loved one with dementia becomes physically aggressive. This doesn’t always happen, but as many individuals with Alzheimer’s progress into the middle stages of the disease, behavioral problems such as aggression do surface.

Now and then, you forget where you left your keys. Occasionally, you inadvertently place the milk in the pantry and the cereal in the fridge, and overlook that cup of coffee you reheated in the microwave.